Which Of The Following Is True Of The General Agreement On Trade In Services

By 2020-12-21Okategoriserade

5. Which of the following points does not apply to the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS)? This definition defines virtually all public services as “commercial” and already covers areas such as the police, the military, prisons, justice, public administration and government. In a relatively short period of time, this could apply to the privatization or commercialization of a large part, and perhaps to all those who are now considered public services that are currently considered social requirements for the entire population of a country, structured, marketed, under-distributed to for-profit suppliers and ultimately fully privatized and are only available to those who can pay the price. This process is currently well advanced in most countries, usually (and deliberately) without properly informing the public or consulting whether this is what they want or not. No no. The results of the sectoral negotiations are specific new commitments and/or exemptions for the sector concerned. They are therefore not legally independent of other sectoral obligations and are not different agreements from the GATS. New obligations and exemptions from the MFN were included in existing lists and exception lists in separate GATS protocols. The GATT came into force on January 1, 1948. From the beginning, it was refined, which eventually led to the creation, on 1 January 1995, of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which absorbed and expanded it. To date, 125 nations signed its agreements, which covered about 90% of world trade. A.It is a fully developed agreement that governs all types of international trade. While services currently account for more than two-thirds of world output and employment, they account for no more than 25% of total trade, as measured by the balance of payments.

But this apparently modest proportion should not be underestimated. Indeed, the balance of payments statistics do not cover one of the types of services defined in the GATS, i.e. the supply by commercial presence in another country (mode 3). Although services are increasingly being exchanged in their own legislation, they also serve as essential inputs for the production of goods and, therefore, services, when value-added, account for about 50% of world trade. Members are free to tailor the coverage of the sector and the content of these commitments as they see fit. Commitments therefore generally reflect the objectives and constraints of national policy as a whole and in different sectors. While some members have provided fewer than a handful of services, others have adopted market access and national processing disciplines in more than 120 services out of a total of 160. The service sector classifications mentioned in the GATS are defined in the “W/120 List”[4], which contains a list of all areas that can be negotiated under the GATS.

Webmaster

Author Webmaster

More posts by Webmaster

Stats

  • 105
  • 54 504

curre-n@telia.com